Elective Courses

Undergraduate Electives

Questions about these courses? Contact UMSN's Advisors.

NURS 420 Introduction to Global Health: Issues and Challenges
2-3 Total Credits (2-3 Lecture). Prerequisites: None
This course introduces the student to global health concepts and the network of organizations working to advance health care internationally. Emphasis for this course is on the global burden of disease and determinates of health. It will provide the student with a broad introduction to programs, systems and policies affecting global health. Students will explore facets of the global health care delivery system, health care economics, and the political process and its impact on the health of individuals and populations.
 
NURS 421 Perspectives in Global Health
2-4 Total Credits (2 Lecture or 2 Lecture and 2 Lab). Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, NURS 420 recommended
This is an interdisciplinary clinically focused elective. It will explore the issues that directly or indirectly affect health in low and middle resource countries from an interdisciplinary approach. Students will have the opportunity to travel to an international destination as part of Global Course Connections for an introduction to that country's health care delivery system, focused on global and public health concepts and on health promotion and risk reduction. Students who are not travelling are encouraged to use course assignments to explore how the issues being discussed impact health in another country of particular interest to them. The purpose of the course is to broaden the student’s worldview and global perspective on health care issues. Emphasis for this course is on health equity among nations and for all people.
 
NURS 421 has one 2-credit section for students who are only taking the on-campus seminar. Students who are participating in the seminar and an optional field experience will need to register for a separate 4-credit section. An application is required for the field experience. Students who are accepted will register for all 4 credits during the Winter term and should plan in advance to incorporate the 4 credits into their schedule. Destinations for the field extension vary each year. 
 
NURS 477 Cultural Aspects of Health and Illness
3 Total Credits (3 Lecture). Prerequisites: None
This course focuses on the health attitudes, beliefs, and practices of patients and health care professionals of culturally diverse populations in the United States. Socioeconomic-political factors that influence health care delivery and health seeking behavior will be explicated. Emphasis will be placed on strategies to facilitate inter/intracultural communication and inter/intragroup dynamics in health care settings.
 
NURS 501 Care of Adults with Cancer
3 total hours (3 Lecture, Web-Blended). Prerequisites: All Level 1 and Level 2 Courses
Given the considerable burden of cancer on patients, families, and society, this course aims to prepare students in the care of this complex collection of diseases. In this fourth-year elective, undergraduate nursing students will build upon a strong foundation of medical-surgical, psychiatric, and community health nursing to examine the spectrum of cancer, from detection and risk reduction, through active treatment and side effect management, to survivorship and end-of-life. Undergraduates and graduate students in other disciplines are welcome to take the course to understand the essential clinical issues faced by patients with cancer and their families. Students will identify the biological and genetic determinants of cancer, examine the pertinent issues surrounding diagnosis, treatment, and supportive care, and formulate plans of care for advanced disease, psychosocial support, survival, and palliative care. Evidence-based 95 interventions will be highlighted throughout the course. Cancer care is inherently interdisciplinary; faculty and guest lectures will include several disciplines. There will be opportunities for students to engage with different teaching modalities, including experiential learning, case studies, and didactic presentations.
 
HS 200 Enhanced Clinical Competency Course
1-2 Total Credits (1-2 Lab). Prerequisite: All Level 1 Courses
This elective course will utilize theoretically-based teaching strategies and simulated clinical experiences to provide development of enhanced clinical competencies with leveled complexity for undergraduate nursing students who are self and/or faculty referred. The course will focus on assessing student learning needs and application of classroom theory to the clinical environment, psychomotor skills, judgment and clinical reasoning. Students will integrate research evidence, professional standards and principles from sciences and humanities into nursing care. The opportunity for repetitive practice and contextual application will be provided to students in the simulated clinical setting, allowing for assessment, cue recognition, problem identification, priority setting, decision-making, implementation of appropriate nursing actions and evaluation of patient outcomes. Systematic faculty assessment and student self-assessment of knowledge, skills and attitudes will occur throughout the course.
 
HS 300 Spanish for Healthcare Professionals
6 Total Credits (6 Seminar). Prerequisite: 1 Year of College Level Spanish or the equivalent
This is an interdisciplinary elective course integrating Spanish language with a clinical focus on health and healthcare in Oaxaca, Mexico. The purpose of this course is to strengthen the student's Spanish language skills while introducing them to global health concepts and organizations working to improve health in Mexico. The student will travel for six weeks to a supervised international site in Oaxaca, Mexico. The first four weeks are spent in intensive Spanish instruction, including medical Spanish, and language and cultural immersion experiences in the region. The last two weeks are spent volunteering at a clinical or social services site in Oaxaca and continued instruction in medical Spanish. Learning modules will introduce the student to Mexico's health care delivery system as well as global and public health concepts of health promotion, risk reduction, and determinates of health in the Mexican population.
 
HS 404 Gender-Based Violence: From Theory to Action
2-3 Total Credits (2-3 Seminar). Prerequisite: None
In this course we will examine gender-based violence and the skills necessary to provide advocacy services to survivors. This course will introduce students to the roots of gender-based violence, the social and cultural context in which it occurs, the mental and physical health impacts, justice and restitution frameworks, and will explore approaches to changing those structures in order to reduce or end it. Students will develop the skills to think critically about the local and global impact of gender-based violence, how it intersects with other forms of oppression, and to develop an understanding of these issues that will be useful intellectually, personally, and professionally. Students will be required to participate in experiential learning hours outside of class. Registering for 2 credits will require 10 hours of attendance at campus events related to gender-based violence. Registering for 3 credits will require 30 hours of training that provides in-depth information on issues related to sexual and intimate partner violence.
 

Graduate Electives

Questions about these courses? Contact UMSN's Advisors.

NURS 501 Care of Adults with Cancer
3 total hours (3 Lecture, Web-blended). Prerequisites: Graduate Student Status
Given the considerable burden of cancer on patients, families, and society, this course aims to prepare students in the care of this complex collection of diseases. In this elective, nursing students will build upon a strong foundation of medical-surgical, psychiatric, and community health nursing to examine the spectrum of cancer, from detection and risk reduction, through active treatment and side effect management, to survivorship and end-of-life. Undergraduates and graduate students in other disciplines are welcome to take the course to understand the essential clinical issues faced by patients with cancer and their families. Students will identify the biological and genetic determinants of cancer, examine the pertinent issues surrounding diagnosis, treatment, and supportive care, and formulate plans of care for advanced disease, psychosocial support, survival, and palliative care. Evidence-based interventions will be highlighted throughout the course. Cancer care is inherently interdisciplinary; faculty and guest lectures will include several disciplines. There will be opportunities for students to engage with different teaching modalities, including experiential learning, case studies, and didactic presentations.
 
NURS 521 Introduction to Global Health: Issues and Challenges
3 Total Credits (3 Lecture) Prerequisites: Graduate Student Status or Permission of Instructor
This course introduces the student to global health concepts and the network of organizations working to advance health care internationally. Emphasis for this course is on the global burden of disease, determinants of health and the importance of an interdisciplinary approach to health care delivery. It will provide the student with a broad introduction to programs, systems, and policies affecting global health. Students will explore facets of the global health care delivery system, health care economics, and the political process and its impact on the health of individuals and populations.
 
NURS 695 Selected Topics in Nursing
1-4 Total Credits (Independent Study/Special Topics). Prerequisite: Graduate student status, or Permission of Instructor
This masters-level course consists of selected topics or clinical phenomena in nursing. The topic will be announced one semester in advance.
 
NURS 886 Topics in Women's Health
PhD Program; Elective 3 Credits (Independent Study/Special Topics). Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor
This PhD-level course is intended to enable student to identify and pursue special areas of theory and research in women's health. It may be conducted as independent study with individual students or in small groups. Thus, the particular themes addressed will vary somewhat as a function of student interest in phenomena related to the concentration.
 
NURS 887 Special Topics in Nursing
PhD Program; Elective 3 Credits (Seminar). Prerequisites: PhD Program Enrollment
This PhD-level seminar is offered from time to time to deal with special topics not otherwise covered in the required curriculum. It may be offered by School of Nursing faculty or by visiting faculty.
 
HS 505 Team-Based Clinical Decision Making
2 Total Credits (2 Recitation). Prerequisites: Graduate Student Status
This inter-professional course is designed for students in: dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and social work. The course allows health professional students to gain an understanding of how each discipline contributes to the healthcare team and the importance of effective communication and team collaboration to clinical decision making.
 
HS 510 Foundations of Informatics in Practice
4 Total Credits (4 Lecture, Web-blended). Prerequisites: None
This course emphasizes the practical application of informatics and the impact of health IT on people, populations and health care delivery. The course is based on an interprofessional perspective of informatics theories, principles and practices and the conceptual building blocks of how data is collected, structured, exchanged, organized, indexed, manipulated, analyzed, and communicated in health and healthcare.
 
HS 520 Assessment for Population Health
4 Total Credits (4 Lecture, Web-blended). Prerequisites: None
Population health assessment informs how decisions ar emade in regard to the allocation of resources to improve the health of a group. This course will introduce students to the emerging field of population health and the methods used to assess the health of a population. The course will include a review of the multiple factors that influence the health of populations. We will review methods of data collection and analysis used to determin the health status of a population. We will review processes of building collaborations and partnerships with stakeholders, and strategies for successful dissemination of needs assessment findings. 
 
HS 550 Scientific Methods for Health Sciences: Fundamentals
4 Total Credits (3 Lecture + 1 Lab). Prerequisites: Graduate Standing or Permission of Instructor
This course provides students with an introduction to probability reasoning and statistical inference. Students will learn theoretical concepts and apply analytic skills for collecting, managing, modeling, processing, interpreting and visualizing (mostly univariate) data. Students will learn the basic probability modeling and statistical analysis methods and acquire knowledge to read recently published health research publication.
 
HS 601 Health Economics for Health Professionals
4 Total Credits. Prerequisites:  Algebra and statistics within the scope of HS 550, or Permission of Instructor
Applied to health care, economics is a study of the efficient organization of health care delivery to achieve high quality and affordable health care and improved population health. The course is structured as a progressive application of increasingly more advanced economic theories and analysis methods to a set of topics, with each subsequent topic building upon theories and methods learned in the previous topics. The course will cover the economic theory of healthcare, economic theory and methods as they apply to health insurance, health care delivery, and population health; and economic evaluation methods in health care.
 
HS 610 Sociotechnical Components of HIT Systems
3 Total Credits (3 Lecture, Web-blended). Prerequisites: HS 510, or Permission of Instructor
This course explores components of sociotechnical frameworks that underlie for the development, deployment, and maintenance of health information technologies. Strategies and techniques used to analyze and model health information systems requirements are emphasized. New and emerging technologies are assessed for their impact and potential strategic value to an organization.
 
HS 612 Evaluation Methods for Health Informatics
3 Total Credits (3 Lecture, Web-blended) Prerequisites: HS 510 and HS 610, or Permission of Instructor
This course examines health informatics as an empirical science with a focus on studies of information technology as it is applied in health and health care. Methods and challenges unique to the evaluation of IT will be examined. Questions about IT functions, processes and the evaluation of IT on organizational and health outcomes.
 
HS 710 Informatics Practicum
3 Total Credits (3 Lecture, Web-blended). Prerequisites: Final Semester (Capstone)
The practicum provides the student with opportunities to develop the diverse skills of informatics-empowered practitioners via an apprenticeship model. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills learned throughout the informatics curriculum in order to support the interconnected needs of individuals, institutions, and populations across the care continuum. The practicum is designed to focus on post-graduate career goals and builds on the student's interests, experiences, and personal attributes. This is an experiential course with students spending approximately 12 hours per week in a physical practicum site accessible to the student
 
HS 851 Scientific Methods for Health Sciences: Applied Inferences
PhD Program 4 Credits (Lecture, Lab). Prerequisites: HS 550 or PhD Program enrollment, or Permission of the Instructor
An intermediate course demonstrating concepts, principals and applications of model construction and statistical inference. This course introduces students to applied inference methods in studies involving multiple variables. Specific methods that will be discussed include linear regression, analysis of variance, and different regression models. This course will emphasize the scientific formulation, analytical modeling, computational tools and applied statistical inference in diverse health-sciences problems. Data interrogation, modeling approaches, rigorous interpretation and inference will be emphasized throughout.
 
HS 852 Scientific Methods for Health Sciences: Linear Modeling
PhD Program 4 Credits (Lecture, Lab). Prerequisites: HS 851, or Permission of the Instructor
This is a general linear modeling course, building on HS 851, focusing on commonly employed scientific computing techniques used in health sciences. The primary aim of the course is to provide students with the necessary skills to determine appropriate use, carry out, and interpret general linear modeling. Statistical software will be used to manipulate data, fit models and perform model diagnostics.
 
HS 853 Scientific Methods for Health Sciences: Special Topics
PhD Program 4 Credits (Lecture, Discussion). Prerequisites: HS 851 and HS 852, or Permission of the Instructor
This course will cover a number of modern analytical methods for advanced health care research. Specific focus will be on reviewing and using innovative modeling, computational, analytic and visualization techniques to address specific driving biomedical and health care applications. The course will cover the 5 dimensions of Big Data (volume, complexity, time/scale, source and management).